Effective product-line testing using similarity-based product prioritization (bibtex)
by Al-Hajjaji, Mustafa and Thüm, Thomas and Lochau, Malte and Meinicke, Jens and Saake, Gunter
Abstract:
A software product line comprises a family of software products that share a common set of features. Testing an entire product-line product-by-product is infeasible due to the potentially exponential number of products in the number of features. Accordingly, several sampling approaches have been proposed to select a presumably minimal, yet sufficient number of products to be tested. Since the time budget for testing is limited or even a priori unknown, the order in which products are tested is crucial for effective product-line testing. Prioritizing products is required to increase the probability of detecting faults faster. In this article, we propose similarity-based prioritization, which can be efficiently applied on product samples. In our approach, we incrementally select the most diverse product in terms of features to be tested next in order to increase feature interaction coverage as fast as possible during product-by-product testing. We evaluate the gain in the effectiveness of similarity-based prioritization on three product lines with real faults. Furthermore, we compare similarity-based prioritization to random orders, an interaction-based approach, and the default orders produced by existing sampling algorithms considering feature models of various sizes. The results show that our approach potentially increases effectiveness in terms of fault detection ratio concerning faults within real-world product-line implementations as well as synthetically seeded faults. Moreover, we show that the default orders of recent sampling algorithms already show promising results, which, however, can still be improved in many cases using similarity-based prioritization.
Reference:
Effective product-line testing using similarity-based product prioritization (Al-Hajjaji, Mustafa and Thüm, Thomas and Lochau, Malte and Meinicke, Jens and Saake, Gunter), In Software & Systems Modeling, 2016.
Bibtex Entry:
@Article{Al-Hajjaji2016,
  Title                    = {{Effective product-line testing using similarity-based product prioritization}},
  Author                   = {Al-Hajjaji, Mustafa
and Th{\"u}m, Thomas
and Lochau, Malte
and Meinicke, Jens
and Saake, Gunter},
  Journal                  = {Software {\&} Systems Modeling},
  Year                     = {2016},

  Month                    = {Dec},

  Abstract                 = {A software product line comprises a family of software products that share a common set of features. Testing an entire product-line product-by-product is infeasible due to the potentially exponential number of products in the number of features. Accordingly, several sampling approaches have been proposed to select a presumably minimal, yet sufficient number of products to be tested. Since the time budget for testing is limited or even a priori unknown, the order in which products are tested is crucial for effective product-line testing. Prioritizing products is required to increase the probability of detecting faults faster. In this article, we propose similarity-based prioritization, which can be efficiently applied on product samples. In our approach, we incrementally select the most diverse product in terms of features to be tested next in order to increase feature interaction coverage as fast as possible during product-by-product testing. We evaluate the gain in the effectiveness of similarity-based prioritization on three product lines with real faults. Furthermore, we compare similarity-based prioritization to random orders, an interaction-based approach, and the default orders produced by existing sampling algorithms considering feature models of various sizes. The results show that our approach potentially increases effectiveness in terms of fault detection ratio concerning faults within real-world product-line implementations as well as synthetically seeded faults. Moreover, we show that the default orders of recent sampling algorithms already show promising results, which, however, can still be improved in many cases using similarity-based prioritization.},
  Day                      = {17},
  Doi                      = {10.1007/s10270-016-0569-2},
  ISSN                     = {1619-1374},
  Owner                    = {Lity},
  Timestamp                = {2018.02.14},
  Url                      = {https://doi.org/10.1007/s10270-016-0569-2}
}
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